Need For Bifocals (Presbyopia)

Patient education is extremely important. When your child comes for an eye exam we try to explain everything about your child's diagnosis to you before you leave and we welcome call-backs. We also offer supplemental methods to improve your understanding of childhood vision problems. Dr. DeRespinis has put together a series of talks on common and not so common eye conditions, with audio-visual enhancements at the following website. Click here to enter the site www.theeyesiteforkids.com

Choose the topic of interest and just click on the icons and sit back and listen. Other sites highly recommended by Drs. DeRespinis & Pearlstein to obtain information on conditions affecting the eyes are hosted by THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR PEDIATRIC OPHTHALMOLOGY & STRABISMUS and THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF OPHTHALMOLOGY. Click on the Links below to enter the sites.

American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus

American Academy of Opthalmology

Presbyopia is a difficulty in focusing that many people begin noticing after age 40. Most people first notice difficulty in reading very fine print. Print seems to have less contrast and a brighter, more direct light is needed for reading. In many cases, patients begin holding reading material further away to help them focus. Eye fatigue often occurs when reading a book or computer screen.

Presbyopia is a normal process that eventually everyone experiences. It can be detected with simple vision testing and a refraction. Depending on the patient's prior vision, reading or bifocal glasses or contact lenses are solutions. Monovision is another solution; using contact lenses or refractive surgery, one eye is adjusted for distance vision and the other eye is adjusted for reading vision.

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