Corneal Transplants

Patient education is extremely important. When your child comes for an eye exam we try to explain everything about your child's diagnosis to you before you leave and we welcome call-backs. We also offer supplemental methods to improve your understanding of childhood vision problems. Dr. DeRespinis has put together a series of talks on common and not so common eye conditions, with audio-visual enhancements at the following website. Click here to enter the site www.theeyesiteforkids.com

Choose the topic of interest and just click on the icons and sit back and listen. Other sites highly recommended by Drs. DeRespinis & Pearlstein to obtain information on conditions affecting the eyes are hosted by THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR PEDIATRIC OPHTHALMOLOGY & STRABISMUS and THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF OPHTHALMOLOGY. Click on the Links below to enter the sites.

American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus

American Academy of Opthalmology

Corneal transplants are commonly used for treating two types of corneal problems. The first is kerotoconus, a disease that causes progressive thinning of the cornea. The second is excessive scarring caused by chemical burns, blunt trauma or other severe lacerations to the cornea.

During the surgery, the central corneal area, known as a corneal button, is removed and replaced with tissue from another person's eye. The replacement corneal tissue is then sutured in place. While vision will not be perfect after recovery, the patient will regain a certain amount of central vision. For kerotoconus patients, a lens is fitted after the surgery to help soften the curvature of the eye and improve vision.

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