Strabismus Surgery

Patient education is extremely important. When your child comes for an eye exam we try to explain everything about your child's diagnosis to you before you leave and we welcome call-backs. We also offer supplemental methods to improve your understanding of childhood vision problems. Dr. DeRespinis has put together a series of talks on common and not so common eye conditions, with audio-visual enhancements at the following website. Click here to enter the site www.theeyesiteforkids.com

Choose the topic of interest and just click on the icons and sit back and listen. Other sites highly recommended by Drs. DeRespinis & Pearlstein to obtain information on conditions affecting the eyes are hosted by THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR PEDIATRIC OPHTHALMOLOGY & STRABISMUS and THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF OPHTHALMOLOGY. Click on the Links below to enter the sites.

American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus

American Academy of Opthalmology

Strabismus surgery is used to realign the muscles that control eye movements. The need for surgery depends on which way the eye is turning, the severity of the turned or crossed eye, and whether or not improvements can be made through glasses or vision therapy. This same day, outpatient surgery is performed most often on children and involves minimal discomfort to the patient. A general anesthetic is used for the surgery. Patients must wear a patch over the eye for the first 24 hours following surgery and take antibiotic eye drops throughout the recovery period. Light activity is prescribed for the first few days after surgery and patients are warned not to get water in the eye by showering, swimming, etc. Full recovery takes place in 1-2 weeks. Once recovery is complete, the patient may still require vision therapy or glasses to maintain proper eye alignment. Strabismus surgery has a high success rate, but in some cases, patients may require a second surgery at some point in the future.

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